Clove Hitch

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

The clove hitch: an essential locking knot that’s quick and easy to tie, once the get the hang of it.

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Italian Hitch

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

The Italian hitch is a knot that’s most often used for belaying when you drop your belay plate, but it has many applications in rescue techniques and various abseil setups.

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Bowline

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

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Yosemite Bowline

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

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Edwards Bowline

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

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Alpine Butterfly

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

The alpine butterfly was designed for use in the Alps (shock), where teams of people need to tie into the same rope. It has several advantages for this use, the biggest one being that it can be loaded in any combination of the three possible directions, with the same strength in any possible way. It also resists jamming when heavily loaded. It’s a good knot. This is one of the ways of tying it, and I find it the easiest to keep track of. It has another benefit that we’ll get to later.

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Double Fisherman’s

Disclaimer: I’d like to make sure it’s understood that these are in no way to be taken as qualified instruction. I suppose that technically I should classify these as ‘reminders’, but it is possible to learn from them… Just make sure you check with someone that actually knows what they’re doing before you try and do them halfway up a cliff.

The double fisherman’s is the knot to which all knots for joining ropes are to be judged against. Strong and bombproof. Standard use is for making prussiks and joining ropes for abseiling. Unfortunately, it jams massively (great for prussiks), making separating ropes after an abseil a pain, and it’s a very symmetric knot, meaning it could potentially get caught when you’re trying to retrieve it. Basically, just tie two stopper knots against each other. As always, leave long tails when joining ropes.

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